Point to point racing differs from racing “under rules” because it is a purely amateur sport. Jockeys are not paid to race, apart from their expenses.
A brown horse with black mane and tail.
Open to any horse which is the property of a Member of the Club or Association stated and which has been hunted and qualified with any Hunt in Great Britain during the current season.
A fenced in area of the course where horses which are about to race parade round in a circle so that spectators may see them. At an allotted time the jockeys then mount their horses and circle round again before heading off onto the course itself.
For those that have been hunted and qualified with the promoting Hunt or any of the Qualifying Hunts listed in the race conditions during the current season.
Races for horses which have been hunted & qualified with the promoting Hunt during the current season, and if so desired, additional Hunt(s) up to an overall total of four, which are the property of Masters, Members, Farmers or Subscribers of that Hunt(s). To be ridden by those qualified to enter or their respective spouses or children or by a person who has paid to the Hunt(s) the subscription for one or more days Hunting who hold a Riders Qualification Certificate for the current season from the Hunt(s) concerned, or Proof of Qualification signed by the Promoting Hunts’ Secretary.
Hunter chases take place at national hunt racecourses, but are only open to horses that have hunter certificates. Hunter certificates are issued to horses that have hunted for at least four days in the season before racing starts in January. In addition, the jockey must be an amateur who has obtained a certificate from the hunt Secretary.

Unlike point-to-points, licensed trainers as well as amateur trainers may have runners in Hunter Chases. This often causes controversy when big name trainers run former Grade 1 horses in Hunter Chases as amateur trainers feel they are unable to compete. New rules which took effect in 2009 will prevent horses which have finished in the first 3 of a Grade 1 or 2 chase in the previous season from taking part.

The two biggest Hunter Chases are the Aintree Fox Hunters’ Chase and Cheltenham Foxhunter Chase. The Aintree Fox Hunters’ is run as the feature race on the first day of the Grand National meeting over one circuit of the Grand National course. This gives amateur riders the chance to jump these famous fences before the professionals.

The Cheltenham Foxhunter is run after the Gold Cup over the same distance and is often referred to as the amateur Gold Cup.

Open to any horse which has been hunted and qualified with any Hunt in Great Britain during the current season, which has NOT WON any Flat Race (other than a National Hunt Flat Race or French AQPS Flat Race), Steeplechase or Hurdle Race under the Rules of any Recognised Racing Authority or any MENS, LADIES, MIXED OPEN or INTERMEDIATE Point-to-Point races.
Open to any horse which has been hunted and qualified with any Hunt in Great Britain during the current season. To be ridden by Ladies only.
Open to horses that have been hunted and qualified with any Hunt in Great Britain during the current season, unless it is CONFINED to horses hunted & qualified with the promoting Hunt or any of the Qualifying Hunts listed in the race conditions or to a Club, Association or Service, which has never won a race at a Point-to-Point meeting or a National Hunt Flat Race, Flat Race, Steeplechase or Hurdle Race under the Rules of Racing or any Recognised Racing Authority other than a match or private sweepstake. A MAIDEN HORSE means a MAIDEN AT THE TIME OF STARTING.
OPEN to any horse which has been hunted and qualified with any Hunt in Great Britain during the current season. To be ridden by Gentlemen only.
OPEN to any horse which has been hunted and qualified with any Hunt in Great Britain during the current season. To be ridden by Ladies or Gentlemen.
Open to any horse which has been hunted and qualified with any Hunt in Great Britain during the current season, unless it is CONFINED to specific Hunts, Clubs, Associations or Services, which has NOT WON any Race under the Rules of Racing or of any Recognised Racing Authority or any Point-to-Point Race OTHER than a Maiden race or Hunt(s) Members race.
The Thoroughbred, also referred to as a “blood horse”, as it is known today was developed in 17th- and 18th-century England, when native mares were crossbred with imported Oriental stallions imported into England from the Middle East: the Byerley Turk (1680s), the Darley Arabian (1704), and the Godolphin Arabian (1729). During the 18th and 19th centuries, the Thoroughbred breed spread throughout the world; they were imported into North America starting in 1730 and into Australia, Europe, Japan and South America during the 19th century. Millions of Thoroughbreds exist today, and more than 118,000 foals are registered each year worldwide.

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